The need for free public Wi-Fi.

The need for free public Wi-If. BY Leeway Sample Persuasive Speech Self-Defense on Campus Speech Commentary Rebecca Hanson You’re tired; you’re hungry. You’ve Just spent a long day at College Library and you can’t wait to get back to your room. Glancing outside, you remember how quickly it becomes dark. You don’t think much of it, though, as you bundle up and head out into the gusty wind. Not until you spy the shadows on the sidewalk or hear the leaves rustling beside you do you wish you weren’t alone.

You walk quickly, trying to stop your imagination from thinking of murderers and rapists. Only when you are safely inside your room do you relax and try to stop your heart from pounding out of your chest. Can you remember a time when you felt this way? I would be surprised if you never have. The FBI reported last year that there were three murders, approximately 430 gag aggravated assaults, 1,400 burglaries, and 80 rapes here in Madison alone. And while these statistics are quite alarming, they don’t even compare to the numbers of larger metropolitan areas.

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No matter where we live, crime affects us all-?men and women, students and instructors, young and old. We need to stop being the victims. One way we can do this is by enrolling in a self-defense course. There are many times I can remember when my heart seemed to pound out of my chest, but because I took an introductory course in self-defense, I feel more confident and more prepared to deal with potentially dangerous situations. Today I would like to encourage all of you to enroll in a self-defense course.

Let’s start by looking at the dangers of crime we face as college students. College students face many crime issues, both as members of society and as students on campus. These crimes endanger our money, our property, our self- inference, our psychological well-being, and even our lives. According to the Foundation for Crime Prevention Education, violence and crime have dramatically increased. An American is six times more likely to be assaulted with a weapon today than in 1960.

The FBI reports that someone is either murdered, raped, assaulted, or robbed every 16 seconds. This means today, at the end of our 50-minute class period, approximately 187 people will have been victims of a violent crime. College students, many of whom are away from home for the first time, are especially easy targets for crime. Students often look at campus housing as a secure place. But according to the book Street Wisdom for Women, precautions must be taken in a dorm or Greek house, Just as in any house or apartment.

How many of these bad habits do you have? How often do you leave your room without locking your door, for getting how easily accessible your room is to anyone? How often do you fall asleep without locking your door? Or how often do you open your door without first checking to see who is there? As the Wake Forest University Police Crime Prevention website states, “Each of us must become aware of the precautions necessary to reduce the childhood that we will become victims of crime. ” Those who forget to take these precautions invite trouble.

Although students must watch themselves in campus housing, they must also take care elsewhere. Prevalent use of drugs and alcohol, especially on college campuses, increases the chance of crime. Using drugs or alcohol makes you an easier target because, as we all know, it affects your Judgment, influencing your decisions on safety. According to the Pacific Center for Violence Prevention, in 42 percent of all violent crimes, either the assailant, the victim, or both had been drinking. Specifically n campus, 90 percent of all violent crimes involve drugs and/or alcohol.

This problem is so serious that testimony by law enforcement officials reprinted on the Security On Campus website indicates that many college campuses are the highest crime areas in their communities. So now that we see the dangers we face as students, what can we do to protect ourselves? Although there are many ways of dealing with crime, I recommend that you and every college student enroll in a self-defense course. You can choose from a variety of self-defense courses offered right here in Madison.

You can find one to fit our schedule and your pocketbook. On campus, the university has a club sport called Shoring Rye Karate, which emphasizes practical self-defense. They hold their meetings in the evening, after classes, right on campus, and they’re open to all university students, faculty, and staff. Another option is Pillar’s Self-Defense and ATA Chi Center, which not only offers courses in self-defense, but in ATA chi, karate, and gung if. Pillar’s location on State Street is convenient for all university students.

To find a class that fits your needs, you can also search over the Internet or through the Yellow Pages. I also brought along some brochures today, so if you are interested, please see me after class. After enrolling in a self-defense course, you will find yourself much better prepared to deal with an emergency situation. Patrick Lee, an instructor for a course called “Self-Defense for Women: Victim or Survivor,” claims the biggest thing he teaches in his courses is that you must decide from the beginning whether you want to be the victim or the survivor.

Repeating over and over again that “l am a survivor” not only increases your self-confidence but helps you think more clearly in a difficult tuition. I didn’t realize the importance of this myself until I took an introductory course in self-defense in my high-school physical education class. After a few days of practice, each of us faced the notorious padded attacker. Expecting to enjoy fighting the attacker, I prepared to yell, “No; stop; back off,” as forcefully as possible. But before I knew it, this man, twice my size, had put me in a hold I could not get out of.

My mind was so overcome with fear that I could barely muster out a “No. ” Immediately, I pictured this as a real situation, one which I probably would not have survived. But after a few more days of practice, we were able to go against the padded attacker one more time. This time, I no longer felt fear. I felt anger. I was angry that this man felt he could take advantage of me. This time, using what I learned, I yelled, “No; back off,” and successfully escaped his move. And this time I survived. I’m not the only example showing the benefits of taking self-defense.

If you’re interested, check out “Stories from Self- Defense Classes” posted to the Internet by the Assault Prevention Information Network. Although I don’t have the time to share with you the dozens of success stories. I can sum them up with a quote by Cindy, a 23-year-old woman who used her self-defense knowledge to scare off an assailant. Cindy says, “l know deep inside, where it matters most, that I have what it takes to defend myself if need be, and this feeling is one of pure Joy. ” As you can see; self-defense is time and money well invested.

So I encourage you to enroll in a self-defense course, whether it be through a physical education class or through a private organization and whether you do it here or back in your hometown. Even if you do not enroll right away, I encourage you to do so in the near future. Taking such a course could mean keeping your money, protecting your property, defending yourself, your boyfriend or girlfriend, husband or wife. It could even mean the difference between life and death. Don’t ever think, “It could never happen to me. ” Why not be prepared?

As Patrick Lee said, “Ask yourself, do you want to be the victim or the survivor? ” The speaker begins with an extended hypothetical example. Vivid and richly textured, it gains attention and relates the topic directly to the audience. It also contains a strong element of emotional appeal-?especially for female students who have expert once the feelings described by the speaker When you begin a speech with a hypothetical example, it’s a good idea to follow up with statistics showing that the example is not far-fetched.

The statistics in this paragraph are especially effective because they come from the city in which the speech was given. After reinforcing the fact that crime is a concern for all members of her audience, the speaker focuses on the specific issue of enrolling in a self-defense course. She estate lilies her credibility by citing the benefits she gained from taking such a course. Although she stresses her personal experience here, it becomes clear as the speech goes on that she has also done a great deal of research on the topic.

This speech is organized according to Monomer’s motivated sequence. In this paragraph, the speaker begins her discussion of the need for students to enroll in a self-defense course. Notice how she identifies the sources of her statistics and translates the figures into terms that relate directly to her classmates. Moving from the general crime statistics in the previous paragraph, the speaker focuses on crime issues facing college students.

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